The Cloud Broke – a poem

The cloud broke
And teardrops fell
On the desks
Of those who fell
For the lure
Of a cloudy hell.


The landlord laughs
To see such fun
Collects his rent
From web he spun
He still gets paid
When things don’t run.


I said t’would be
It’s come to pass
Surprised? Not me
With or without Bass
Autodesk’s cloud
Can kiss this SaaS.

6 Comments:

  1. don’t quit your day job!
    kidding, I could never compose such wit.
    I have to ask though, did anyone care much (the outage, not your poem)? How long was this for?
    I see some serious items in the list, but also wonder if the handling on cloud downtime is proportional to the products involved. There are no major products that run SAAS – autocad, revit, 3dsmax, maya, infraworks, navisworks… – so there is no real test of if adesk could make them reliable (assuming they could run SAAS in the first place without full virtual desktop). Does the fusion 360 gang get all uppish if they can’t collab on something, or are they so enamored that they say “its been so good to us it deserves a rest for a few hours”?

  2. I see, several hours for the timeframe. I don’t use any of those with red x so I think Autodesk handled this beautifully! Just never make a critical product cloud based and it all works, what’s the problem?

  3. ‘The cloud’ didn’t fail, a server center failed. It could/should have easily fallen back to other server centers in other locations. What really failed was a cloud infrastructure design without zone or geo redundancy and that is pretty poor.

    • Coulda/shoulda/woulda doesn’t count. The infrastructure Autodesk chose to use failed. From a customer point of view, the cloud broke.

    • Robin, Isn’t that like saying the chain did not fail, just one link of it? I would have thought the term “server center” is exactly what the cloud is. I would almost claim the term cloud was chosen rather than “offsite servers” so non-computer people would not worry about what it is, as cloud is about as non-descriptive as it gets.

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